Syllabus for SSC MTS (Multi Tasking Staff)

Computer Based Examination: Mastering the Indicative Syllabus

As the world becomes more and more digital, so does the way we assess knowledge and skills. Computer based exams are rapidly becoming the norm, and mastering the indicative syllabus is crucial for success. In this article, we will dive deep into the four parts of the computer based examination and provide a comprehensive guide to acing each one.

Part I – Numerical and Mathematical Ability

The first part of the computer based examination focuses on numerical and mathematical ability. This section tests candidates’ knowledge of fundamental arithmetic operations and basic geometry. The syllabus includes topics such as integers and whole numbers, LCM and HCF, decimals and fractions, percentages, ratios and proportions, work and time, simple interest, profit and loss, discount, area and perimeter of basic geometric figures, distance and time, and interpretation of simple graphs and data.

To excel in this part, candidates must have a thorough understanding of these mathematical concepts and be able to solve problems accurately and efficiently. Practice is key to mastering this part, and candidates should attempt as many practice problems as possible to build their confidence and accuracy.

Part II – Reasoning Ability and Problem Solving

The second part of the computer based examination tests candidates’ reasoning ability and problem solving skills. This section measures the general learning ability of the candidates and includes topics such as alpha-numeric series, coding and decoding, analogy, following directions, similarities and differences, jumbling, problem solving and analysis, and non-verbal reasoning based on diagrams. Age calculations and calendar and clock questions may also be included.

To excel in this part, candidates must develop their logical thinking and problem solving skills. Practice with similar problems will help them develop a systematic approach to solving problems and increase their accuracy.

Part III – General Awareness

The third part of the computer based examination tests candidates’ knowledge of general awareness. This section covers a broad range of topics, including social studies (history, geography, art and culture, civics, and economics), general science, and environmental studies up to 10th standard.

To excel in this part, candidates must have a broad understanding of these subjects and stay up-to-date with current events. Regular reading of newspapers and general knowledge books can help candidates stay informed and improve their scores.

Part IV – English Language and Comprehension

The fourth and final part of the computer based examination tests candidates’ understanding of the basics of the English language. This section includes vocabulary, grammar, sentence structure, synonyms, antonyms, and correct usage. Candidates may also be asked to read a simple paragraph and answer questions based on it to test their comprehension skills.

To excel in this part, candidates must have a good command of the English language and develop their reading and comprehension skills. Regular reading and practice with grammar and vocabulary exercises can help candidates improve their language skills.

Conclusion

In conclusion, mastering the indicative syllabus of the computer based examination is crucial for success. Each part of the examination tests different skills and knowledge, and candidates must develop a systematic approach to each part to excel. Regular practice and staying informed of current events and general knowledge can also improve scores. With dedication and hard work, candidates can ace the computer based examination and take the first step towards their dream career.

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